Dorchester neighborhood notes

Staff Writer
Link Boston Homes

Easter egg hunt

The annual Dorchester Park Easter egg hunt will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 15 at the park, 2174 Dorchester Ave.

Kids should bring their own baskets to collect hidden eggs. RCN staff will take photos with the Easter Bunny when the egg hunt is over. Parents should look for the table near the tennis courts.

For further information, call 857-598-9500.

Duplo Day

The Fields Corner Branch Library, 1520 Dorchester Ave., will offer a free Duplo Day program for kids from 10:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 15.

Please join us for mornings filled with building with Lego Duplo blocks, books and fun. This program is best for children, ages 2 to 5 years old, accompanied by an adult.

Call 617-436-2155 for more details.

Healthcare conversation

Massachusetts Secretary of Health and Human Services Marylou Sudders and Dr. James O’Connell of Boston Health Care for the Homeless will have a conversation on healthcare from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Monday, April 17 at the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum, Columbia Point.

Sudders and O’Connell will discuss key healthcare issues, challenges and opportunities for consumers with moderator Emily Reimer of WCVB.

Reservations are required for this free program by calling 617-514-1646 or online at www.jfklibrary.org.

Puppet show

The National Marionette Theater will perform “Hansel and Gretel” in a free family program at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, April 18 at the Stephen Smith Center, John F. Kennedy Library, Columbia Point.

The master puppeteers will bring to life one of the most famous of the Grimm Brothers’ stories with beautifully crafted puppets, scrolling scenery and the music of Engelbert Humperdnick.

Reservations are required and can be made by calling 617-514-1646 or by sending an email to JFKcelebrate@nara.gov. Adults must accompany children.

Further information can be found at www.jfklibrary.org or by calling 617-514-1646.

Vacation fun

The Fields Corner Branch Library, 1520 Dorchester Ave., will offer free, fun programs for kids during April vacation at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, April 18, at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, April 19 and at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, April 21.

On Tuesday, kids can create silly spring planters that make great porch or window decorations. Seeds to grow native wildflowers will be included.

The library will show the award-winning animated film “Zootopia” on Wednesday, with complimentary popcorn. Friday’s program will be a concert with Matt Heaton. Families can enjoy his fun mix of rockabilly, surf music, American roots and Irish traditional music.

For more information and to register, call 617-361-2524.

All about owls

Staff from the Mass Audubon Trailside Museum will present a program on owls at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, April 19 at the Adams Street Branch Library, 690 Adams St.

Kids, ages 5-12, can meet and learn about four different owls, explore what makes owls special, the role they play in the environment and how humans affect their ability to survive. Visitors will be able to see the owls up close, handle natural history artifacts and ask an experienced naturalist questions.

Seating is limited. Admission is free. Call 617-436-6900 to register or for more information.

Family movie

The Lower Mills Branch Library, 27 Richmond St., will screen the recently released Disney movie “Moana” from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 19.

The PG film follows the adventures of a teen girl and a demigod in search of a legendary island. Admission is free.

For more information, call 617-298-7841.

Author talk

The John F. Kennedy Library and Museum, Columbia Point, will welcome Dr. Andrew Farah, chief of psychiatry, University of North Carolina, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 20.

Farah is the author of “Hemingway’s Brain.” He will discuss the new book with Dr. Linda Miller.

Reservations are required for this free program by calling 617-514-1646 or online at www.jfklibrary.org.

Jazz night

Greater Ashmont Main Street and Mandorla Music Series will present the Jason Palmer Quartet in concert 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 20 at the Parish of All Saints, 209 Ashmont St.

Trumpeter Palmer is becoming one of the most in demand musicians of his generation. For this show, he will be joined by Max Light on guitar, Jared Henderson on bass and Lee Fish on drums. He has performed with jazz legends like Roy Haynes, Herbie Hancock and Jimmy Smith and top contemporary players like Greg Osby and Ravi Coltrane. He has released eight albums under his own name, most recently “Beauty & Numbers: The Sudoku Suite.”

The $15 door cost will include an opening dessert reception featuring a local bakery as well as non-alcoholic beverages. Wine will be available for purchase.

Further information can be found at www.jazzboston.org.

Children’s concert

Entertainer Matt Heaton will perform in a free concert at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, April 20 at the Lower Mills Branch Library, 27 Richmond St.

Families can listen to Heaton’s fun mix of rockabilly, surf music, American roots and Irish traditional music.

Call 617-298-7841 for further details.

Birds of prey

The Uphams Corner Branch Library, 500 Columbia Road, will host a free program on birds of prey at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 20.

Children, ages 6 and older, can discover the different birds of prey that call Massachusetts home. Students begin the presentation by handling touchable artifacts to discover the adaptations that make these birds such fierce hunters and that define this group. The program concludes with a live animal encounter featuring two birds of prey. Large groups must register at 617-265-0139.

Starring Olivier

Films starring British acting legend Lord Laurence Olivier is being shown at the Lower Mills Library, 27 Richmond St., from 1 to 3 p.m. on Fridays, April 21 and 28.

Featured will be the thriller “Marathon Man” with Dustin Hoffman on April 21; and the WWII adventure “The 49th Parallel” co-starring Leslie Howard, the following week.

Admission is free. Call the library at 617-298-7841 for more information.

Theater performance

ArtsEmerson and the Mayor’s Office of Resilience and Racial Equity will present “Mr. Joy” at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 21 and 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 22 at the Strand Theater, 543 Columbia Road.

The play by Daniel Beaty explores what happens in a community when Mr. Joy, a Chinese immigrant whose shoe repair shop has been a pillar in the neighborhood for decades, is the victim of an attack. Told from the point of view of Mr. Joy’s customers, it reveals the impact the shop owner has on each of their lives.

Admission is free. Further information can be found at www.downtownboston.org/events.

Earth Day celebration

The Franklin Park Zoo, One Franklin Park Road, will present “Party for the Planet,” an Earth Day celebration, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 22.

Festivities will include crafts, games and activities, scavenger hunts, animal encounters, zookeeper talks and environmentally friendly exhibitors. Special activities will be held at Birds’ World, the tiger and lion exhibits, Tropical Forest, Franklin Farm and more.

For more information and a schedule of activities, visit www.zoonewengland.org or call 617-541-5466.

Violin concert

Ashmont Hill Chamber Music will welcome Daniel Bernard Roumain in concert at 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 23 at Peabody Hall, All Saints Church, 209 Ashmont St.

Rising star Haitian-American violinist, composer and performer DBR will perform “Redemption Song & Sonatas” that he describes as "a musician's view on civil rights around the world". A performance by Project STEP students of his “Rosa Parks Quartet” will also be featured.

Further information can be found at www.ashmonthillmusic.org or by calling 617-827-7857.

Maritime history exhibit

The Commonwealth Museum in the Massachusetts Archives building, Columbia Point, is displaying “From Slavery to Freedom: African Americans and Maritime History” now through May 26.

The sea played a significant role in the history of African-Americans. It was a source of misery on the dangerous passage from Africa to the new world, but by the 19th century Massachusetts had become an important center of the abolitionist movement. Seaport communities became avenues of escape for fugitive slaves and a source of employment, especially in the whaling port of New Bedford.

This exhibit traces important themes in maritime history that have often been hidden

Further information can be found at www.sec.state.ma.us/events or by calling 617-727-9268.