All of the programs, events and exhibitions are virtual, open to the public and most are free of charge. Because this year's festival is completely virtual, attendees and presentations are not only scheduled from throughout the Boston area but also from London, New York, Fort Lauderdale, Detroit and elsewhere.

Boston Design Week announces the debut of its new “Fall Season.” The groundbreaking three-week all-virtual design festival runs on Wednesdays through Saturdays from Sept. 30 through Oct. 18.

All of the programs, events and exhibitions are virtual, open to the public and most are free of charge. Because this year’s festival is completely virtual, attendees and presentations are not only scheduled from throughout the Boston area but also from London, New York, Fort Lauderdale, Detroit and elsewhere.

Attendees are invited to explore all aspects of design, shedding light on groundbreaking ideas in architecture, interior design, fine art and ultimately how culture plays a role in these concepts. Social crises are also brought into the conversation such as the consequences of climate change in architecture and interior design and the impact of social inequity on emerging design and the design community.

To sign up for the eNews or see the full calendar of events visit www.BostonDesignweek.com or follow along on Facebook at www.facebook.com/bostondesignweek, Twitter @BosDesignWeek, or on at Instagram @BostonDesignWeek.

The fall season of Boston Design Week kicks off Wednesday, Sept. 30 with the Boston Design Center’s fall market. This year’s Boston Design Market is virtual and primarily takes place on Zoom and Instagram.

Boston Design Center’s annual market features two full days of keynotes, more than 10 showroom events and more - all online. This broad range of design forums from accredited speakers and designers provides insight and inspiration into new home fashions that brightens any work from home experience. Download Boston Design Center’s new app to follow all of the events for the market.

Design Week includes several programs with a focus on interior design. Clark Living is partnering with television’s Taniya Nayak to discuss kitchen design and appliances. Nayak has been regularly featured as host and interior designer on HGTV, the Food Network's “Restaurant Impossible” and on ABC.

Other notable designers include: Tim Corrigan, whose design philosophy combines European elegance with California comfort; Catherine Bertulli, a carpet designer who works with New England artists to translate their paintings and sculptures onto custom rugs; and Scot Meacham Wood, a designer who draws inspiration from his Scottish roots in his signature tartan patterns.

Interior design is also discussed in a panel on sustainable furnishings, moderated by Anelle Gandelman, who is founder of A-List Interiors, New York. Also joining in is Susan Inglis, the executive director of the Sustainable Furnishings Council, and Laura Hodges, founder of Laura Hodges Studios.

The topic of sustainability is also addressed by The International Furnishings and Design Association (IFDA). Jacqui Becker of Jacqueline Becker Fine Arts moderates a panel with designer Lisa Tharp, architect JB Clancy of Albert Righter Titman Architects, Bob LaFond of Terrene of New England and Boston Green Design, and Rachel White, CEO of Byggmeister Design Build. These designers share how they practice sustainability in home design, building and interior design in New England. Furthermore, architecture and interior design firm, Slocum Hall, leads a panel of designers to discuss designing and building for climate change titled “Future Proof.”

This fall for the first time, Boston Design Week has invited fine art organizations and businesses to join the festival. The Eliot Street School of Jamaica Plain is partnering with the Museum of Fine Arts to host two events on racial equity in craft and design.

Eve M. Kahn presents her research on 19th century artist Mary Rogers Williams, who biked and hiked across Europe and New England while dodging misogyny and widely exhibiting avant-garde paintings.

The MIT List Visual Arts Center will also host a virtual tour of the MIT campus art that was created by accredited artists.

Peter Hastings Falk, art historian and chief editor and curator of Discoveries in American Art, presents his work curating the exhibition, “It’s time to Stick Together: 60 Years of Collage in America” at the Robert Berry Gallery.

Childs Gallery, one of Boston’s best-known galleries, will present a program focusing on art in interior design.

Expanding beyond the boundaries of Boston, the fall session brings together designers from across the country and even across the pond. Design Core Detroit will host a presentation by Kiana Wenzell on the role of design festivals in preserving culture.

Zero Empty Spaces based in Fort Lauderdale, makes an appearance to discuss their work creating affordable artist studios in vacant store fronts with the goal of expanding the appreciation of art.

Melinda Marquardt, founder and designer of The Vale, joins the conference from London. She will take people on a journey illustrating how she transforms her original art into textiles and wallpaper. Marquardt will also share her techniques and inspiration for her latest two collections.

“Boston is Design Strong!” said co-producer Tony Fusco. “Robert Four and I are undertaking this effort to thank everyone who supports Design Week, to help boost art and design businesses and organizations, and to create a sense of community again. We are all in the same boat, and we hope everyone is rowing in the same direction.” 

Boston Design Week is produced by Tony Fusco and Robert Four of Fusco & Four/Ventures, LLC.