The average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage is 3.82 percent, up 5 basis points since the same time last week. A month ago, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was lower, at 3.75 percent.

Several benchmark mortgage rates climbed this week. The average rates on 30-year fixed and 15-year fixed mortgages both were higher. The average rate on 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages, or ARMs, the most popular type of variable rate mortgage, also increased.

The average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage is 3.82 percent, up 5 basis points since the same time last week. A month ago, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was lower, at 3.75 percent.

At the current average rate, you’ll pay principal and interest of $467.10 for every $100,000 you borrow. That’s up $2.85 from what it would have been last week.

The average 15-year fixed-mortgage rate is 3.22 percent, up 4 basis points over the last seven days.

Monthly payments on a 15-year fixed mortgage at that rate will cost around $701 per $100,000 borrowed. Yes, that payment is much bigger than it would be on a 30-year mortgage, but it comes with some big advantages: You’ll save thousands of dollars over the life of the loan in total interest paid and build equity much faster.

The average rate on a 5/1 ARM is 4.07 percent, ticking up 5 basis points since the same time last week.

These types of loans are best for those who expect to sell or refinance before the first or second adjustment. Rates could be substantially higher when the loan first adjusts, and thereafter.

Monthly payments on a 5/1 ARM at 4.07 percent would cost about $481 for each $100,000 borrowed over the initial five years, but could increase by hundreds of dollars afterward, depending on the loan’s terms.

Michael Becker, a branch manager with Sierra Pacific Mortgage, sees rates going back down.

He said, “After a period where negative economic news and reports moved markets and pushed rates lower, it seems that markets and interest rates are being moved by reports of positive developments in both the trade war with China and Brexit negotiations. Equities have moved higher, while bonds sold off pushing rates higher the last few days. This optimism will be short-lived as I think weak economic data will continue to come in and this will drive mortgage rates lower in the coming week.”

Greg McBride, senior vice president and chief financial analyst at Bankrate.com, adds, “Disappointing retail sales and a lack of clarity on the trade situation with China will keep mortgage rates range-bound.”

Dick Lepre, a senior loan officer at RPM Mortgage, believes rates will hold steady. He notes, “The techs reveal that there is no consensus where things are going. Fed policy is changing, tariffs seem to change at least twice a week, and some people are forecasting recession. Despite near-term uncertainty, the fact is that the U.S. economy continues to be healthier than (most of) the rest of the world and, as time goes on, flight-to-quality buying should lower Treasury yields and mortgage rates - just not this coming week.”

Mitch Ohlbaum, a loan officer with Macoy Capital Partners, said, “Rates will stay the same. The 10-year is trading at 1.77 percent (as of 10/15) and we have seen some bigger-than-normal swings in the Treasury market and short-term rates as the market is feeling a bit nervous. Since September 3rd, when we hit the recent bottom of 1.459 percent and swung all the way up to 1.901 percent just 10 days later, we have been bounding around ever since. When you look into the employment numbers for September, you would see that the U.S. has (on average) been creating about 158,000 jobs per month compared with last year at about 238,000 per month, signaling that a slowdown has already begun. Overall, you can expect rates to decrease as we head into the rest of the fourth quarter.”