Here are the latest Waterfront - North End - Financial District neighborhood notes:

Visit with Paul Revere

The Paul Revere House, 19 North Square, will host a visit from Paul Revere from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 20.

Re-enactor David Connor will bring Revere to life, reflecting on the Midnight Ride, his family life, his work as a silversmith and his activities as a member of the Sons of Liberty.

Admission is free with museum admission. Members and North End residents are admitted free at all times.

Further information can be found at www.paulreverehouse.org or 617-523-2338.

Easter party

North End Against Drugs will host the annual Easter party from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 20 at the Nazzaro Center, 30 North Bennet St.

The morning will feature egg coloring, crafts, face painting, balloon artists and photos with the Easter Bunny between 10 and 11 a.m. Parents should bring their own cameras. Caravan Puppets will entertain at 11 a.m.

People of all ages are welcome, but the program is best suited for kids, ages 10 and under. Parents must accompany children.

Admission is free. Call 617-635-5166 for further information.

Boston Ballet story time

The North End Branch Library, 25 Parmenter St., will offer story time with the Boston Ballet from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Monday, April 22.

Children and families are welcome to hear stories about a famous ballet or dancer. The story time is also supplemented with a movement experience that highlights major themes of the story. Boston Ballet faculty dance educators will lead the program, which is for children age 2 and up. Younger children will need parental supervision.

Call 617-227-8135 for further information.

Boston’s North End

The Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston St., will present a free talk, “Boston’s North End: Post-World War II Italian Immigration, Segmented Assimilation and the ‘Problem of Cornerville’” from 5:15 to 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 23.

James Pasto of Boston University, with comment by Marilynn Johnson of Boston College, will examine the dynamics and impact of Italian immigration in the North End via the lens of segmented assimilation. Depending on age, gender, parental style and opportunity, some immigrants assimilated “downward” into the Italian American street culture of the neighborhood, becoming more susceptible to the drug abuse and violence of the ’70s and ’80s, while others assimilated “upward” into a new Italian identity tied to the North End’s gentrification as an Italian neighborhood.

Registration is required for this free program. To RSVP, e-mail seminars@masshist.org or call 617- 646-0579.

Inner Harbor boat tour

The community is invited to join a boat tour of the “Inner Harbor Connector” from noon to 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 23. Participants will meet at Fan Pier Dock.

This boat tour of the “Inner Harbor Connector” is a new ferry route proposed in a water transportation business plan to be released by Boston Harbor Now.

Register at www.eventbrite.com/e/inner-harbor-connector-boat-tour-tickets-59460441782.

Boston’s Scollay Square

The North End Branch Library, 25 Parmenter St., will welcome author David Kruh at 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 24.

Kruh is the author of “Always Something Doing: Boston’s Infamous Scollay Square,” a history of this famous Boston area. The audience will hear about the square’s pre-Colonial origins through its heyday as an entertainment mecca, to its current role as City Hall Plaza. He will visit the Old Howard Theater, Crawford House and Joe & Nemo’s Hotdog Stand and relive the days when Vaudevillians, comedians and strip tease ruled the square.

For more information, call 617-227-8135 or visit www.bpl.org.

Taste of the North End

The North End Community Health Center will present the 26th annual Taste of the North End celebration from 7 to 11 p.m. on Friday, April 26 at the DCR Steriti Memorial Ice Rink, 561 Commercial St.

The master of ceremonies will be Billy Costa of NESN.

More than 35 local restaurants will participate with samples of the food that made the North End famous. There will be a wide array of appetizers, cheeses, entrees and desserts, as well as wine and beer.

The evening will also feature a high-end silent auction and live music and dancing.

Proceeds will benefit the programs of North End Waterfront Health and other North End charities for children and elders.

For tickets and further information, visit https://totne2019.brownpapertickets.com or call 617-643-8106.

Music for strings

The Bach, Beethoven and Brahms Society will present from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, April 28 at historic Faneuil Hall, 4 South Market St.

The program will include Bach’s “Overture in C Major,” Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 3 (“Eroica”) and Brahms’ “Concerto for Violin and Cello’ with violinist In Mo Yang and cellist Cicely Parnas.

Tickets range from $20 to $70.

Visit www.bbbsociety.org or by call 617-423-3883 for more information.

Bookbinding exhibition

The North Bennet Street School, 150 North St., is displaying “Bound Together: Bookbinding by the NBSS Community” now through April 30.

Attendees will tour the bindery, meet faculty and students, learn more about the curriculum and discover scholarship opportunities.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

For more information, visit www.nbss.edu or call 617-227-0155.

Photography tours

PhotoWalks will offer a walking tour of the North End from 1 to 2:30 p.m. on Sundays and Thursdays during April, meeting at the intersection of Hanover and Cross Streets.

The North End welcomed waves of immigrants seeking the American dream. Today, it is a popular hot spot famous for its busy restaurants, quaint cafes and crowded pastry shops. Highlights include Paul Revere’s house, Old North Church, Hanover Street, the Rose Kennedy Greenway and some hidden gems off-the-beaten-path.

Participants can learn how to take photographs with instruction on creative composition and getting the most out of a digital camera. Historical commentary on the sites will also be given.

Tickets are $40 for adults and $20 for youths, ages 10 to 17. Advance reservations are required.

Call 617-851-2273 or visit www.photowalks.com for more details and to purchase tickets.

Dark side of Boston

Boston by Foot is currently presenting guided walking tours of the darker side of Boston from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Participants should meet the guide at the corner of Hanover and Cross Streets, across from the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway. Reservations are not required.

Visitors will hear the stories of misery, misfortune and murder based on true, historical events, such as the Great Influenza, the vandalizing of the Royal Governor’s House, the Molasses Flood and the infamous Brink’s robbery, all against the backdrop of Boston’s oldest neighborhood.

Tickets are $13 for adults, $8 for children if purchased online in advance and free for members. Add $2 for tickets purchased from the guide on the day.

For more information, visit www.bostonbyfoot.org or call 617-367-2345.

Nature films

The New England Aquarium, Central Wharf, is presenting three films at 10 a.m. and 1, 2, 4 and 6 p.m. from now through April 30 in the IMAX Theater.

The films include “Oceans: Our Blue Planet,” “Galapagos: Nature’s Wonderland” and a new film “Pandas!” All will be presented in 3-D.

For more information, visit www.neaq.org or call 617-226-2149.

Homework help

Free homework help will be available from 4 to 6 p.m. on Wednesdays at the North End Branch Library, 25 Parmenter St.

Students in grades K through 8 are invited to drop in for homework help, academic support and mentoring. The Boston Public Library Foundation funds this Out-of-School Time program.

Visit www.bpl.org or call 617-227-8135 for further information.