Here are the latest Downtown - Fort Point - Leather District - Seaport neighborhood notes:

Social fitness festival

The third annual Boston Social Fitness Festival will be held from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 15 at City Hall Plaza.

This free daylong festival is designed to get Boston moving. Festivities will start with sunrise yoga at 7 a.m. and continue with Bollywood dancing, an open-air spin ride, aerial yoga, kickboxing, CrossFit, sports playground and more. There will also be special kids’ programs.

The fitness classes are free, but many require advance registration.

Visit www.socialfitnessfestival.com for further information and to register.

Black owned businesses

The September Boston Black Owned Business pop-up market will be held from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 15 in the heart of the Seaport area at District Hall, 75 Northern Ave.

The community is encouraged to shop and support local black owned businesses while enjoying raffles, music and community building.

Further information can be found at www.eventbrite.com/e/bostons-black-owned-business.

Arts and crafts talk

The Societies of Arts and Crafts will host a talk with artist-in-residence Laura Petrovich-Cheney from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 15 at 100 Pier Four Blvd.

Petrovich-Cheney’s recent artistic practice is a dialogue between environment, feminism and history/innovation. Her works take many different forms including sculptural installations and wooden quilts. She has recently exhibited at the International Quilt Study Center and Museum in Lincoln, NE and the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton.

Admission is free.

Call 617-266-1810 visit www.societyofcrafts.org for more information and to register.

Louisa May Alcott’s Boston

In celebration of the 150th anniversary of the publication of Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel, “Little Women,” Boston By Foot will offer a walking tour of Alcott’s Boston from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 16, meeting at the plaza at Washington and School Streets.

Today’ readers associate Alcott mostly with Concord, but her contemporary readers associated her prolific writing with Boston. Both before and after the 1868 publication of “Little Women” for which she is best known, Alcott lived for long periods in Boston and identified strongly with the city’s ethos.

The tour co-sponsored by the Boston Literary District will focus on Alcott and her literary contemporaries, their connections with each other and their Boston world.

Tickets are $15 or $5 for members.

Visit www.bostonbyfoot.org or call 617-367-2345 for tickets and further information.

Cycling celebrations

The 14th annual Hub on Wheels citywide ride and Finish Line Festival will be held from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16 at starting at City Hall Plaza.

Hub on Wheels will run from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., exploring the shoreline and neighborhoods of the city. Cyclists can choose from two routes: 12 car-free miles through the heart of the city, pedaling past iconic landmarks like Fenway Park, Boston Common, the State House, Faneuil Hall and more; and the Emerald Necklace route, a 40+ mile journey down car-free Storrow Drive and across the historic Emerald Necklace park system, including scenic views of The Riverway, Jamaica Pond, Arnold Arboretum, Franklin Park, Neponset River pathways and many of Boston’s neighborhoods and landmarks.

Registration is $55 for adults and will include ride support, snacks and gift bags. Kids ride free on the downtown route and must be accompanied by an adult.

The festival will be in full swing all day long and will include food, free concerts, bike stunt shows, a beer garden and more.

Proceeds will benefit Boston Children’s Hospital.

Visit www.tdhubonwheels.com or call 617-262-3424 for more information.

Staged reading

The community is invited to a staged reading of “Tangles in Your Teeth” with the Fort Point Theatre Channel at 5:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept 16 at the Waterfront Plaza, 290 Congress St.

In this new play, it is the day before Thanksgiving and the Colby/Murphy/DiNapoli family is dealing with family folklore, infidelity, existential experiences, and depressed family members. The play uses poetry, magical realism and the absurd to create a world we can all relate to.

Admission is free.

Visit www.fortpointtheatrechannel.org for more information.

Liberty teas

The Old South Meeting House, 310 Washington St., will present an interactive presentation “Liberty Teas and Nervous Collectors” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 19.

Attendees will learn how the Townshend Acts of 1767 and 1768 impacted everyday life in 18th century Boston, led to the formation of the Sons of Liberty and set the stage for the tensions that would erupt in 1770 with the Boston Massacre.

The interactive, first person presentation will feature costumed actors from the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum.

Admission is free. This lecture is presented as part of the Paul Revere House Lecture Series.

Further information is available at www.oldsouthmeetinghouse.org or by calling 617-482-6439.

17th century New England

The Partnership of the Historic Bostons will present “The Lust for Land and the Roots of King Philip’s War,” a free program as part of the annual Boston Charter Day celebrations, at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, 138 Tremont St.

King Philip’s War (1675-1678) was the largest conflict of 17th-century New England and resulted in mass casualties to both Native nations and English settlers. Historian and author Lisa Brooks will go beyond the usual facts and figures to share individual people’s stories. She will reflect on people at every level of early New England’s hierarchies: from Puritan merchants to Harvard-educated Native scholars to Indigenous women leaders, to show how their status played a role in their decisions.

Brooks is professor of English and American Studies at Amherst College and the author of “Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War.”

Registration is suggested, online at www.eventbrite.com/e/the-lust-for-land.

For more information and a schedule of further programming during the Charter Day celebrations, visit www.historicbostons.org.

Lantern festival

The fifth annual Lantern Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 22 in Boston’s Chinatown at the Rose Kennedy Greenway.

The day of fun will include arts and crafts, games and mooncake sampling (from 2 to 3 p.m.) to kick off the celebrations for the traditional autumn festival. There will also be a showcase of various traditional Chinese performances at the main stage, including lion dances, Chinese folk dances, martial arts demonstrations, tai chi and more. Food vendors will be available. Admission is free.

Chinatown Main Street, the Department of Arts and Tourism and the Kennedy Greenway Conservancy are hosting the festival.

For more details, visit www.chinatownmainstreets.org.

Textile exhibitions

The Societies of Arts and Crafts is displaying “Infinite Vibration,” works by Niho Kozuru, and “Landscapes, Crafted” at the Society of Arts and Crafts, 100 Pier 4 Blvd.

Kozuru’s buzzing resin sculptures and wall pieces feature layers of visual intrigue created by glossy materials and high-key color. This exhibit is open through Sept. 29.

“Landscapes, Crafted,” guest curated by Luiza deCamargo, presents an exploration of the land by five craftspeople: Kathryn Clark, Kat Cole, Josh Copus, Peter Houk and Tania Larsson. Each of these artists responds to landscape – natural, built and social – and the intersections of people and the world around us. This exhibit closes on Oct. 27.

Visit www.societyofcrafts.org or call 617-266-1810 for more information.

Carousel is open

The Rose F. Kennedy Conservancy’s Greenway carousel is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sundays through Thursdays and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays for the summer season.

This one-of-a-kind carousel features animals native to Boston such as lobster, cod, fox, squirrel, grasshopper, peregrine falcon, turtle, oarfish, whale, rabbit, harbor seal and more. It was designed to be accessible to individuals with physical, cognitive and sensory disabilities.

Rides are $3 each or $25 for a book of 10. Visit www.rosekennedygreenway.org for more information.

Made in Fort Point

The Made in Fort Point store at 315 A St. is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays and from noon to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

The store sells and exhibits art, craft and design of more than 75 Fort Point Arts Community members and hosts special events and community meetings. Visitors can find paintings, jewelry, prints, photography, ceramics, furniture, lighting, artists’ books, wearables, greeting cards and more, all made by local artists.

Call 617-423-1100 or visit www.fortpointarts.org for more information.