The average rate you’ll pay for a 30-year fixed mortgage is 4.44 percent, a decrease of 3 basis points over the last seven days. A month ago, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was lower, at 4.39 percent.

Several key mortgage rates fell this week. The average rates on 30-year fixed and 15-year fixed mortgages both fell. Meanwhile, the average rate on 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages also slid lower.

Rates for mortgages are constantly changing, but, overall, they are very low by historical standards. If you’re in the market for a mortgage, it may make sense to go ahead and lock if you see a rate you like. Just make sure you’ve looked around for the best rate first.

The average rate you’ll pay for a 30-year fixed mortgage is 4.44 percent, a decrease of 3 basis points over the last seven days. A month ago, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was lower, at 4.39 percent.

At the current average rate, you’ll pay principal and interest of $503.13 for every $100,000 you borrow. Compared with last week, that’s $1.77 lower.

The average 15-year fixed-mortgage rate is 3.85 percent, down 3 basis points since the same time last week.

Monthly payments on a 15-year fixed mortgage at that rate will cost around $732 per $100,000 borrowed. The bigger payment may be a little tougher to find room for in your monthly budget than a 30-year mortgage payment would, but it comes with some big advantages: You’ll come out several thousand dollars ahead over the life of the loan in total interest paid and build equity much more quickly.

The average rate on a 5/1 ARM is 4.11 percent, ticking down 5 basis points over the last week.

These types of loans are best for those who expect to sell or refinance before the first or second adjustment. Rates could be substantially higher when the loan first adjusts, and thereafter.

Monthly payments on a 5/1 ARM at 4.11 percent would cost about $484 for each $100,000 borrowed over the initial five years, but could climb hundreds of dollars higher afterward, depending on the loan’s terms.

The most popular belief among financial experts is that rates will trend back up.

Robert A. Brusca, chief economist of Fact and Opinion Economics, points out, “The U.S. Treasury 10-year note has pushed up to 2.96 percent, and mortgage rates are still adjusting upward in the wake of that shift.”

Shaun Guerrero, branch manager at New American Funding, said, “Based on current market trends, I highly recommend that borrowers lock in loans that are in progress.”

Derek Egeberg, a certified mortgage planning specialist and branch manager of Academy Mortgage, said, “Mortgage rates will march higher as expected. The drift toward higher rates looks to be inevitable.”

Elizabeth Rose, sales manager at Nations Lending, adds, “With a constant stream of good news in the economy, mortgage bonds are under pressure. When economic news is good, mortgage rates rise — and this trend is likely to remain in place. In the coming months, the Treasury will increase the amount of debt supply in the market, adding additional pressure to mortgage bonds and keep mortgage rates on the uphill climb.”

Jim Sahnger, a mortgage specialist with C2 Financial Corporation, said, “The Fed left rates unchanged amid data that the economy continues to pick up strength and comments attesting the same. More rate hikes will be coming and, with them, we should see more movement in all interest rates, including mortgage rates. For now, though, mortgage rates should hang tight during the banter on trade and concerns over where it could take us for the next week.”