On Tuesday, the average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage dipped back to 4.44 percent, down 1 basis point. A month ago, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was lower at 4.42 percent.

After starting the week by climbing upwards, several benchmark mortgage rates tapered off at midweek. The average rates on 30-year fixed and 15-year fixed mortgages both retreated on Tuesday. The average rate on 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages, meanwhile, also ticked downward.

Rates for mortgages are in a constant state of flux, but they remain low by historical standards.

The average rate you’ll pay for a 30-year fixed mortgage rose on Monday to 4.45 percent, an increase of 2 basis points over the previous.

On Tuesday, the average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage dipped back to 4.44 percent, down 1 basis point. A month ago, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was lower at 4.42 percent.

At the current average rate, you’ll pay a combined $503.13 per month in principal and interest for every $100,000 you borrow. That’s a decline of $0.59 from last week.

The average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage is 4.44 percent, down 1 basis point over the last seven days. A month ago, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was lower, at 4.42 percent.

At the current average rate, you’ll pay a combined $503.13 per month in principal and interest for every $100,000 you borrow. That’s a decline of $0.59 from last week.

The average rate on a 5/1 ARM is 4.17 percent, sliding 4 basis points since the same time last week.

These types of loans are best for those who expect to sell or refinance before the first or second adjustment. Rates could be substantially higher when the loan first adjusts, and thereafter.

Monthly payments on a 5/1 ARM at 4.17 percent would cost about $487 for each $100,000 borrowed over the initial five years, but could ratchet higher by hundreds of dollars afterward, depending on the loan’s terms.

Derek Egeberg, a certified mortgage planning specialist and branch manager at Academy Mortgage, believes rates will go back up. He said, “The “summer slide” has begun. Rates will continue to slowly inch higher throughout the year.”

Greg McBridge, senior vice president and chief financial analyst at Bankrate.com, sees rates going up as well. “If the rhetoric over tariffs and trade manages to subside, expect a little lift in long-term rates.”

Michael Becker, a branch manager with Sierra Pacific Mortgage, said, “While the longer term trend is still about rising mortgage rates, I think we could see a small dip in mortgage rates in the coming week. President Trump seems to be upping the rhetoric in regards to trade tariffs and this should cause some concern about global growth. Add in concerns about Angela Merkel’s ability to remain in power in Germany and you have the makings of a small dip in rates in the coming week.”